takeoff is optional but landing is mandatory.

   edit   deselect

 

we have to use the reins of reason on the horse of emotion.

   edit   deselect

 

Moderate stress enhances learning. When two neurons fire together, they become wired together. When a strong and weak neuron—call them Al and Betty—stimulate a third neuron—call it Charlie—at the same time, the weak one, Betty, gains the ability to stimulate Charlie to fire. That’s why the ringing of a bell could cause Pavlov’s dog to salivate even when there was no food present. Scientists, with their ever playful juggling of three or four languages at once, call that long-term potentiation (LTP). So risk is an integral part of life and learning. A baby who doesn’t walk, for example, will never risk falling. But in exchange for taking

   edit   deselect

 

We think we believe what we know, but we only truly believe what we feel.

   edit   deselect

 

But in the long course of evolution, it has been a successful strategy.

   edit   deselect

 

Perceptions come at you like the 6 million hits you get when you do an Internet search. Without a powerful search engine, you’re paralyzed. One search engine involves emotional bookmarks, in which feelings help direct logic and reason to a place where they can do useful work. A second strategy the brain uses for handling complicated problems is to create mental models, stripped-down schematics of the world.

   edit   deselect

 

In more subtle tricks, the magician creates a mental model for you, a short-term memory of the world.

   edit   deselect

 

One of the reasons magic tricks work can be explained through a brain system called working memory. It is a general purpose workspace, and most of us experience it as attention or conscious thought. In addition, there are specialized systems for verbal and nonverbal information, and they have a type of short-term memory that allows perceptions to be compared with one another over the span of a few seconds. The general purpose area can take in information from the specialized systems (sight, smell, sound, and so on) and can integrate and process that information through what LeDoux calls “an executive function.” That

   edit   deselect

 

Working memory can also retrieve information from long-term memory. The fact that you can read this long sentence is the result of your working memory’s ability to hold the beginning, middle, and end all at once and to retrieve definitions and associations from long-term memory and use them to make sense of the words. It is also the result of the fact that you have created mental models of the words.

   edit   deselect

 

But the model he created before the plane appeared did not contain the plane.

   edit   deselect

 

If things don’t go according to the plan, revising such a robust model may be difficult. In an environment that has high objective hazards, the longer it takes to dislodge the imagined world in favor of the real one, the greater the risk. In nature, adaptation is important; the plan is not. It’s a Zen thing. We must plan. But we must be able to let go of the plan, too.

   edit   deselect

 

The rigid person is a disciple of death; The soft, supple, and delicate are lovers of life.

   edit   deselect

 

In system accidents, unexpected interactions of forces and components arise naturally out of the complexity of the system. Such accidents are made up of conditions, judgments, and acts or events that would be inconsequential by themselves. Unless they are coupled in just the right way and with just the right timing, they pass unnoticed.

   edit   deselect

 

Perrow used technical terms to describe those systems. He called them “tightly coupled.” He said that they must be capable of producing unintended complex interactions among components and forces. In his view, unless the system is both tightly coupled and able to produce such interactions, no system accident can happen (though other failures happen all the time).

   edit   deselect

 

He’s talking about a theory called “risk homeostasis.” The theory says that people accept a given level of risk. While it’s different for each person, you tend to keep the risk you’re willing to take at about the same level. If you

   edit   deselect

 

The person who has the best chance of handling a situation well is usually the one with the best…mental pictures or images of what is occurring outside of the body.”

   edit   deselect

 

Survivors aren’t fearless. They use fear: they turn it into anger and focus.

   edit   deselect

 

The trick is to become extremely stingy with your scarce resources, balancing risk and reward, investing only in efforts that offer the biggest return.

   edit   deselect

 

Helping someone else is the best way to ensure your own survival. It takes you out of yourself. It helps you to rise above your fears. Now you’re a rescuer, not a victim. And seeing how your leadership and skill buoy others up gives you more focus and energy to persevere. The cycle reinforces itself: You buoy them up, and their response buoys you up. Many people who survive alone report that they were doing it for someone else (a wife, boyfriend, mother, son) back home.

   edit   deselect

 

Purpose is a big part of survival, but it must be accompanied by work.

   edit   deselect

 

The survivor plans by setting small, manageable goals and then systematically achieving them.

   edit   deselect

 

The birds are the radar of the forest.”

   edit   deselect

 

ways of seeing and walking that were used by Native American trackers and other Aboriginal peoples. He called it “Owl Eyes and the Fox Walk,” that full-body alertness

   edit   deselect

 

certain people, when afraid, experience “activation of the amygdala [which] will lead working memory to receive a greater number of inputs, and inputs of a greater variety, than in the presence of emotionally neutral stimuli.”

   edit   deselect

 

Like an immune system, it defined the inside and the outside. And by being responsible to each

   edit   deselect

 

“A pattern of movements developed after my initial wobbly hops and I meticulously repeated the pattern. Each pattern made up one step across the slope and I began to feel detached from everything around me. I thought of nothing but the patterns.” His struggle had become a dance, and the dance freed him from the terror of what he had to do.

   edit   deselect

 

Countless survivors have reported the same thing: by developing a pattern and then fixing on nothing but making the pattern perfect, they were able to get out of seemingly impossible situations.

   edit   deselect

 

Survival is adaptation, and adaptation is change,

   edit   deselect

 

Perceive, believe (look, see, believe).

   edit   deselect

 

Stay calm (use humor, use fear to focus).

   edit   deselect

 

survivors use patterns and rhythm to move forward in the survival voyage,

   edit   deselect

 

Thought is metaphoric, and proceeds by comparison, and the metaphors of language derive there-from.

   edit   deselect

 

On the contrary, as Richards argues, meaning is derived from the 'co-presence of the vehicle and the tenor'; the two constitutive parts of a metaphor are essential.

   edit   deselect

 

Meaning is not inherent in words, Saussure insisted, but rather is constituted by systematic patterns of similarity and difference.

   edit   deselect

 

In the second half, he provides a careful and well-informed overview of rhetoric as a system or 'Network'.

   edit   deselect

 

we began to reflect upon language in order to defend our own'

   edit   deselect

 

For Saussure, as we have noted, the relationship between a 'sign' and what it 'signifies' is arbitrary. A sign and signifier coexist by convention to produce a meaning ('cat'), and do so by virtue of their 'difference' from other combinations ('bat'). Post-structuralism, writes Terry Eagleton, took this insight one step further, dividing the sign from the signifier, and recognizing a plurality of meanings: '"Cat" may mean a furry four-legged creature, a malicious person, a knotted whip, an American, a horizontal beam for raising a ship's anchor, a six-legged tripod, a short tapered stick, and so on' (Eagleton 1983:128–29).

   edit   deselect

 

Derrida always understood his 'rhetorical' method as a mode of ideology critique because it involves 'an attempt to dismantle the logic by which a particular system of thought and behind that a whole system of political structures and social institutions maintains its force'

   edit   deselect

 

Burke's confidence in the flexibility of language to unsettle deeply held assumptions about how our social experience is organized and his commitment to this as an ongoing process, goes some way to explaining his difficult style, both his addiction to paradox and the dizzying moves he makes in his argument.

   edit   deselect

 

One aim of Rhetoric of Motives, then, is to elucidate those persuasive acts of which we are barely conscious, especially those which reaffirm our place within the established social order, and by which we discreetly manage our antagonistic relationship with others. To underscore this development Burke substitutes the term 'persuasion' with a new keyword, 'identification'.

   edit   deselect

 

However, he may also do so by effecting a yet more extreme reversal, by reclaiming the importance of rhetoric as

   edit   deselect

 

Scientists, with their ever playful juggling of three or four languages at once, call that long-term potentiation (LTP). So risk is an integral part of life and learning

   edit   deselect

 

He’s talking about a theory called “risk homeostasis.” The theory says that people accept a given level of risk. While it’s different for each person, you tend to keep the risk you’re willing to take at about the same level. If you

   edit   deselect

 

Working memory can also retrieve information from long-term memory. The fact that you can read this long sentence is the result of your working memory’s ability to hold the beginning, middle, and end all at once and to retrieve definitions and associations from long-term memory and use them to make sense of the words. It is also the result of the fact that you have created mental models of the words.

   edit   deselect

 

Perrow used technical terms to describe those systems. He called them “tightly coupled.” He said that they must be capable of producing unintended complex interactions among components and forces. In his view, unless the system is both tightly coupled and able to produce such interactions, no system accident can happen (though other failures happen all the time).

   edit   deselect

 
in graph:
     

    Show Nodes with degree > 0:

    0 0

    Show Contexts:


    Reset Filters
    network diversity level:
         
    Main Topical Groups
    (graph communities):
    N/A

    Most Influential Elements
    N/A

    Insight Question
    (structural gap):
    N/A

    Stats:
    total
    0
    nodes, graph density
    0
    , average degree:
    0

    Network Structure:
    N/A
      [?]

    0
    modularity,
    0
    % of words in the top topic (total
    0
    topics),
    0
    % in the main connected component (
    0
    in total), influence dispersal
    0
    %


    Reset Graph   Export: PNG Gexf
    Main Topics
    (according to Latent Dirichlet Allocation):
    loading...

    Most Influential Words
    (main topics and words according to LDA):
    loading...

    LDA works only for English-language texts at the moment. More support is coming soon, subscribe @noduslabs to be informed.